Tailored Living

arrives with patience

20 notes

newlists:
Message back Tinder matches it’s too shy to initiate conversation with.
Let it be Dungeon Master in all future D&D campaigns.
Drink and drive.
Allow it to humiliate you so it can become “Vine famous.”
Buy it cans for the big party on Friday night because it has no ID.
Take the Scientologist personality test “just to see what it’s like.”
Be its token gay friend.
Drop acid and watch that fucking awful Oliver Stone film about the Doors.
Collect and paint Warhammer figurines, except you have to be the Eldar
Take care of its dog while it’s on holiday even though everyone knows you don’t even like dogs.

newlists:

  1. Message back Tinder matches it’s too shy to initiate conversation with.
  2. Let it be Dungeon Master in all future D&D campaigns.
  3. Drink and drive.
  4. Allow it to humiliate you so it can become “Vine famous.”
  5. Buy it cans for the big party on Friday night because it has no ID.
  6. Take the Scientologist personality test “just to see what it’s like.”
  7. Be its token gay friend.
  8. Drop acid and watch that fucking awful Oliver Stone film about the Doors.
  9. Collect and paint Warhammer figurines, except you have to be the Eldar
  10. Take care of its dog while it’s on holiday even though everyone knows you don’t even like dogs.

(via carpejuggulum)

1,633 notes

jtotheizzoe:

via watershedplus:

Yellowstone’s Grand Prismatic is named for its brilliant colouration. The colour spectrum that ranges from deep blue to burnt red is the product of trillions of thermophiles, or bacterial microorganisms, which flourish in hot waters. Different temperatures determine the hue, and the centre’s blue is the result of extreme heat (70 °C or 160 °F) that leaves the bacteria sterile.
Picture by Werner Van Steen/Getty

Extremophiles are proof of the power of evolution. On Earth, it seems like wherever life could remotely, possibly exist, it does.

And only by studying them, whether they grow in beautiful ponds like this or in the dark, ugly mud at the bottom of ocean vents, we can understand the limits and possibilities of biology.

As Dr. Ian Malcolm reminds us: